0 comments on “Phonehacking Trial, Day 7”

Phonehacking Trial, Day 7

AFTER near unanimity on the best ‘lines’ from the first few days of the trial, today seemed to mark the first day when papers chose different angles.

Always interesting when the press do this on any story as it gives you a little insight into how they think editorially and what they think will push their readers’ buttons.

Many of them spend a large amount of money and time finding out exactly what their readers think, do and consume and if a paper is well-targeted you can tell a lot about its readership from the angles it takes on stories and the stories it chooses for page leads, and the others it drops completely.

Anyway, here’s the coverage from today, enjoy.

Daily Mail

The Independent

The Guardian

Daily Mirror

Hacked Off

The Drum

Evening Standard

Press Association (here on MSN)

Peter Jukes has been doing a great job livetweeting the trial and is now crowdsourcing funds to help him keep at it until Christmas – a very worthy cause.

That’s it for now. As ever, if you spot something superlative, give me a shout.

0 comments on “Phonehacking Trial, Day 6”

Phonehacking Trial, Day 6

Week Two of the trial and stories are still coming thick and fast.

It’s still the opening of the trial, which the judge has decided can be livetweeted and @PeterJukes is doing a particularly fine, comprehensive job. The line about codewords from the film ‘Where Eagles Dare’ proved irresistible in the early copy today.

Coverage today.

Guardian and the “Where Eagles Dare” line.

Daily Mail

The Independent

Daily Telegraph

The Drum

Hacked Off

Broadsword calling Danny Boy – signing off until I see some later takes this evening.

0 comments on “Phonehacking Trial, Day 5”

Phonehacking Trial, Day 5

EARLY take on the coverage up so far on the phonehacking trial. As usual if more emerges later I will update.

The coverage has been pretty comprehensive this week, both online, in print, livetweeting and blogging. I think some predictions that the trial might be downplayed proved to be ill-founded.

It has been interesting for me watching site stats to see which links have been most clicked, and at this time of night, The Guardian outstrips the rest quite easily, even after I started handicapping it a bit by dropping it down the list. However, later on, in the small hours of the morning, sites like The Daily Beast, The Drum and Hacked Off come back strongly with a lot of visitors heading their way from here.

Anyway, coverage is as follows:

Press Association (on MSN here, also available on BT and on homepages of Newsquest, Johnston Press and Trinity Mirror)

Evening Standard

The Independent

The Drum

Hacked Off

Daily Mail

Daily Telegraph

The Guardian

It will be interesting to see what, if anything, the Sundays do with this given that they don’t normally go for trial coverage as it will have been gone over thoroughly in the Saturday papers. I will round them up here if they do anything significant with it.

That’s it for now, an interesting week and more to come. Have a good weekend.

UPDATE

Eastern Daily Press with a local line

0 comments on “Five laws editors need to know better than their staff”

Five laws editors need to know better than their staff

BEING an editor places great demands on your time.

You might well have arranged training for your staff, but have you thought about your own? When was the last law refresher you attended?

You might reasonably leave day-to-day spotting of legals to your newsdesk and subs, but in some cases it is you that will be held responsible when things go wrong.

Here, briefly, are five areas of law an editor really needs to know.

1 – Sexual offences anonymity
There is now a large number of offences which give anonymity to a victim as soon as a an offence is reported and that report can be to anyone, not just police. Relatively new offences like trafficking and voyeurism are catching journalists out because they do not realise they are sexual offences.

The consequences of breach are very serious, a prosecution under the Sexual Offences Amendment Act 1992 – and the CPS will sometimes prosecute both the paper and the editor. Conviction will result in a criminal record for a sexual offence.

2 – Contempt of Court

The law isn’t new, it’s been around since 1981, but what is new is Attorney General Dominic Grieve’s willingness to prosecute.

He said when he took office that prejudicial publication was a concern and he has been true to his word in allowing prosecutions for contempt.

They can still, theoretically, jail editors for contempt (last time that happened was the editor of The Mirror in 1949 over converage of the Haigh Acid Baths Murders) Nowadays they give the editor a personal fine, as well as the paper. Fines are unlimited, but tend to be in the tens of thousands of pounds.

Publication of material which would not have resulted in prosecution five years ago, is now being being taken to court.

3 – Defamation Act 2013

Libel remains your most potentially expensive problem. The new Act will probably be implemented from summer 2014. It contains new defences and new limits on how claimants can take action against you. You and your staff need to understand the changes it introduces.

4 – Bribery Act, RIPA, Misuse of Computers

The laws we saw Leveson explore at some length. You may well be taking on young, technically adept journalists. They, and you, need to know the legal limits on use of their technical expertise in obtaining stories. Likewise, what is a bribe, who can be bribed and how to avoid a bribery charge?

5 – Copyright

The next big issue coming down the track I think. Journalists are magpies and tend to regard the Internet as a limitless source of free material, especially imagery. People posting pictures online seem to be becoming more aware of their legal rights over such material and we will, I think, start seeing actions for copyright breach in the near future for the sort of online pilfering reporters have regarded as safe up until now.

If the above has given you pause for though, I run in-house law refreshers for editors and their staff. All sessions are tailored to the individual publication concerned. If you would like to talk about training, drop me a line at davidbanksmedialaw@gmail.com